Insuring Your Business With a Buy/Sell Agreement

Tip: All in the Family. Family owned businesses account for 62% of total US employment and are responsible for 78% of all new jobs. Yet only about 30% of them survive into the second generation.
Source: Conway Center for Family Business, 2015

Life insurance is designed to help protect a household from the financial hardships that may follow the untimely death of a primary wage earner.

But how will a death affect a small business?

One way of safeguarding a business is to create a buy-sell agreement. A buy-sell agreement is a contract between different entities within a corporation to buy out the interests of a deceased or disabled member. A buy-sell agreement also can protect the business from loss of revenue and cover the expense of finding and training a replacement.

Types of Buy-Sell Agreements

There are two main types of buy-sell agreements commonly used by businesses:

Cross-Purchase Agreement. In a cross-purchase agreement, key employees have the opportunity to buy the ownership interest of a deceased or disabled key employee. Each key employee takes out a policy on each of the other key employees. Cross-purchase agreements tend to be used in smaller companies where there are not too many key employees to cover.

Stock-Redemption Agreement. Stock-redemption agreements are formal agreements between each of the key employees—and the business itself—under which the business agrees to purchase the stock of deceased key employees. Key employees agree to sell their shares to the company, often in exchange for a cash value.

These agreements establish a market value for a key employee’s share of the company.

Funding a Buy-Sell Agreement

There are several options for funding a buy-sell agreement:

Set Aside Funds. Money for a buy-sell agreement can be set aside, as long as it is easily accessible. These funds must be kept up for the life of the company, and may present a temptation during fiscally tough times. The business owners must determine the appropriate amount needed to cover the cost of a buy-out.

Fast Fact: What’s the Right Time? A buy-sell agreement can be put into place at any time, but it often makes sense to do so when a business is formed or when a new partner is brought in.

Borrow the Needed Amount. A company can borrow enough to buy out a withdrawing key employee at the time of his or her death. However, the loss of the employee can often affect a company’s ability to secure a loan, and the payments become an added stress on the business during an already difficult time.

Life Insurance. Purchasing a life or disability policy in order to fund a buy-sell agreement is an option when preparing for the future. Using life insurance enables a buy-sell agreement to be funded with premium payments and attempts to ensure that funds will be available when they are needed.

Several factors will affect the cost and availability of life insurance, including age, health, and the type and amount of insurance purchased. Life insurance policies have expenses, including mortality and other charges. If a policy is surrendered prematurely, the policyholder also may pay surrender charges and have income tax implications. You should consider determining whether you are insurable before implementing a strategy involving life insurance. Any guarantees associated with a policy are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

Protecting Your Business from the Loss of a Key Person

Charles de Gaulle once remarked, “The graveyards are full of indispensable men.”¹ While we know that life goes on regardless of the loss of any “indispensable” person, for a small business, the loss of a key person is not only a human tragedy, it can also represent the potential for significant financial loss.

Though business owners cannot protect themselves from the unexpected and sudden loss of a key employee, they may be able to protect themselves from the financial consequences of such a loss through the purchase of what is called “key person insurance.”

Who’s Key?

There is no legal definition for who a key person is, but he or she is someone whose loss, due to death or disability, would cause a material financial setback to the business. For example, a key person may be a top salesperson whose production would take considerable time to replace. Or, perhaps it’s someone who is guaranteeing the business access to needed future capital.

Key person insurance is a standard insurance policy that is usually owned by the business and whose premiums are paid by the business. These premiums are generally non-deductible. The benefits of the policy are paid to the business in the event that the insured key person dies or becomes disabled.² (Coverage for death and disability are separate policies.)

Calculating Costs

When considering the coverage amount the business owner should first calculate the financial impact of the loss of a key person. The next step is to ascertain the cost of insurance for that amount. With that information, the business owner will then be able to make a decision that balances his or her protection needs with what the business can afford.

The proceeds may be used in any manner deemed appropriate. For example, the proceeds may be needed to meet day-to-day expenses, pay off debts, or to recruit new talent to the organization.

For most businesses, their most important asset is their people. Yet, while they insure their other assets—such as buildings and cars—they often overlook the wisdom of doing the same for those individuals who are critical to their success.

  1. Brainyquote, 2015
  2. Several factors will affect the cost and availability of life insurance, including age, health and the type and amount of insurance purchased. Life insurance policies have expenses, including mortality and other charges. If a policy is surrendered prematurely, the policyholder also may pay surrender charges and have income tax implications. You should consider determining whether you are insurable before implementing a strategy involving life insurance. Any guarantees associated with a policy are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

Can Group, Private Disability Policies Work Together?

According to the Social Security Administration, a 20-year-old has a 25% chance of becoming disabled before reaching age 67.¹

Loss of income for such a duration has the potential to cause significant financial hardship. And while Social Security Disability Insurance may help, it’s critical to understand that 67% of initial applications were denied in 2013 (the latest year for which data is available) and about 90% of SSDI recipients receive less than $2,000 a month.²

Disability coverage may be available through your employer, who may pay all or a portion of the cost for your coverage.

Employer plans typically pay up to 50% of your income. This limited coverage might not be enough to meet your bills, which is why you may want to supplement employer-based coverage with a personal policy. Supplemental policies may be purchased to cover up to about 70% of your income.³

Taxation of Disability Benefits

When you purchase a personal disability policy, the benefit payments are structured to be income tax-free. Consequently, you may not be eligible for coverage that equals your current salary since your take home pay is always less.

If your employer paid for your coverage, then the income you receive generally will be taxable. If you paid for a portion of the employer-provided coverage, then the pro rata amount of the benefits you receive are structured to be tax-free.

Choices, Choices, Choices

Consider the waiting period before disability payments begin. A longer waiting period saves you money, but it also means that you may have to live off your savings for a longer period. You are the best judge of how much of this risk you are comfortable assuming.

You also may want to coordinate the waiting period with any short-term disability benefits you could have. For example, if your short-term disability covers you for 90 days, look to have at least a 90-day waiting period so that you can potentially lower the cost on the long-term policy.

Ask how a policy defines an inability to work. Some policies will say “the inability to do any job or task;” others will say “own occupation.” You may prefer the latter definition so you’re not forced to perform some less-skilled, lower-paid work. That type of work may not help you meet your bills.

  1. Social Security Administration, 2015
  2. The Council for Disability Awareness, 2014 (latest year for which data is available)
  3. Bankrate.com, 2015

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

Planning for the Expected

Perhaps Bette Davis said it best when she observed, “Old age is no place for sissies.” ¹

The challenges seniors have met throughout their lives have made them wiser and stronger, preparing them for the unique challenges that come with aging.

As we age, the potential for cognitive decline increases, ranging from simple forgetfulness to dementia. Long-term illness can sap time and energy from tending to your financial affairs in retirement. Even a decline in vision may make it harder to manage your financial affairs.

Fortunately, you can plan ahead to protect yourself and your family against the financial consequences of deteriorating health, and in many cases, insurance may play an important role.

Let’s examine some of the ways you can employ insurance to help protect your
financial health.

Health Care Costs

For some, health-care costs represent a larger share of their budget as the years pass.

Recognizing this, you may want to consider Medigap insurance to cover the expenses that Medicare does not, which can add up quickly. You also might want to consider some form of extended-care insurance, which can be structured to pay for nursing and home-care services—two services that Medicare doesn’t cover.

Managing Your Wealth

The involvement you have with managing your investments may change as you age. For many seniors, that sort of day-to-day responsibility is unattractive and even untenable.

If that’s the case, you may wish to consider what role annuities can play. Annuities can be structured to pay you income for as long as you live, relieving you of the concern of outliving your retirement money.² Certain annuities even offer extended-care benefits, which allow you to address two concerns with one decision.

Transferring Your Estate

If you’re like many seniors, you have a strong desire to leave something to your children, grandchildren and perhaps a favorite charity. Through the use of life insurance, you can pursue these objectives. For example, life insurance can be used to create an estate or to equalize an estate transfer among your heirs.³

Insurance will never be able to prevent the health issues that come inexorably with age, but it can be used to mitigate the potential financial consequences of them.

  1. BrainyQuote, 2015
  2. The guarantees of an annuity contract depend on the issuing company’s claims-paying ability. Annuities have contract limitations, fees, and charges, including account and administrative fees, underlying investment management fees, mortality and expense fees, and charges for optional benefits. Most annuities have surrender fees that are usually highest if you take out the money in the initial years of the annuity contact. Withdrawals and income payments are taxed as ordinary income. If a withdrawal is made prior to age 59½, a 10% federal income tax penalty may apply (unless an exception applies).
  3. Several factors will affect the cost and availability of life insurance, including age, health, and the type and amount of insurance purchased. Life insurance policies have expenses, including mortality and other charges. If a policy is surrendered prematurely, the policyholder also may pay surrender charges and have income tax implications. You should consider determining whether you are insurable before implementing a strategy involving life insurance. Any guarantees associated with a policy are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

Understanding the Basics of Medigap Policies

Medicare coverage can be a critical component for living a healthy life in retirement, as well as for maintaining your financial independence during these years. Yet, as important as it is, Medicare does not cover the full range of health-care expenses you may experience in your golden years.

To fill the holes that exist in Medicare, Medigap insurance can be purchased by individuals over 65 to supplement Medicare.

A Medigap policy is designed to cover expenses such as copayments, coinsurance and even deductibles—the so-called gaps in Medicare. Coinsurance is only covered after you have paid the deductible, unless you select a Medigap policy that also covers the deductible.

From A to N

Medigap is private health insurance that must follow federal and state laws designed to protect you. In most states, you can only purchase standardized coverage packages, or Plans, each of which is identified by the letters A through N.

These standardized packages must offer the same basic benefits regardless of which insurance company is offering it. Cost is usually the only difference between Medigap policies with the same letter.

All insurance companies are required to offer the Plan A standardized package. Each Medigap plan option (A-N) will differ on the benefits offered and the percentage of coverage for these Medicare gaps.

To get a better understanding of what each of these plans offer, go to www.medicare.gov and click on the “Supplements & Other Insurance” tab at the top of the page. Then click on “How to Compare Medigap Policies.”

An Early Start at 65

You must have Medicare Parts A and B to buy a Medigap policy, and the best time to buy Medigap insurance is within the first six months you are both 65 or older and enrolled in Medicare Part B. By doing this you will not need to undergo a medical underwriting. For those with existing health conditions, this enables them to buy a policy at the same price that is charged for people in good health.

A separate Medigap policy must be purchased for each spouse.

If you are nearing retirement, or have already discovered that these Medicare gaps can be expensive, it may be time to determine if a Medigap policy is right for you.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

What You Should Do About Insurance Following a Divorce

Divorce can be an emotionally and financially challenging life event. In the face of the many possible adjustments divorce entails, making changes to insurance coverage may be overlooked.

Here’s a look at each type of coverage:

Auto

If there is a change in auto ownership, you may need to obtain car insurance coverage to coincide with that change. You also may want to think about removing your former spouse from a policy to protect yourself against potential liability and ensure that his or her name does not appear on any claim check. Don’t forget to notify the insurance company of any address change.

Home

A divorce may mean a new place of residence for one or both spouses. Consider purchasing renter’s insurance if you are moving into a new apartment. If you are staying in your present home, you may want to remove your ex-spouse’s name from the policy and consider changes to any property coverage if, for instance, your former spouse is taking jewelry or other items of value from the premises.

Life

Life insurance is often purchased to cover financial obligations that may occur when a spouse passes away.¹ Life insurance policies may be an element of your divorce agreement. If possible, consider buying a policy on a former spouse’s life if he or she is providing alimony or child support.

If you do retain a pre-existing policy, be sure to review and amend the beneficiary so that it reflects your current wishes.

Disability

A disability may have an adverse impact on the ability of a former spouse to pay alimony or child support. As such, you may want to include the maintenance of such a policy in the divorce agreement.²

Health

If you or your children are covered under your former spouse’s employer group plan, you may want to contact the employer to continue coverage under COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act). If you have an individual policy, you may want to consider adding your children to the policy. You may not want to duplicate coverage for your children.

  1. Several factors will affect the cost and availability of life insurance, including age, health, and the type and amount of insurance purchased. Life insurance policies have expenses, including mortality and other charges. If a policy is surrendered prematurely, the policyholder also may pay surrender charges and have income tax implications. You should consider determining whether you are insurable before implementing a strategy involving life insurance. Any guarantees associated with a policy are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.
  2. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Federal and state laws and regulations are subject to change, which may have an impact on after-tax investment returns. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

When to Self-Insure

One reality of life is that risk is ever present. It exists in our commute to work, in our investment choices, and in our lifestyle decisions. Some risks can be transferred to an insurance company (such as auto or homeowners), while others we assume ourselves.

When you choose to bear the financial burden of an adverse event, you are engaging in self-insurance.¹

You may self-insure by assuming the entirety of a financial risk, or a portion of it. For example, the deductibles you have on your insurance policies are an expression of the portion of financial risk you are willing to assume.

If you want to self-insure, you should consider two action steps.

The first is to attempt to manage risks, such as installing a home alarm or not texting and driving.

The second step is to create a cash reserve to have available for expenses that are associated with any losses you may suffer.

If you choose to self-insure, here are some tips that might help you manage the costs:

  • The deductible you choose is one of the major factors in pricing an insurance policy. Generally, the higher the deducible, the lower the cost of the insurance.
  • You can choose to selectively assume all the risk. For instance, do you really need to purchase extended warranties? Does your 14-year-old car need collision coverage?
  • Consider lengthening the waiting period before payments begin on disability insurance.² By choosing to wait, for example 90 days before beginning benefit payments rather than 30 days, you are self-insuring the 60-day difference, which potentially can reduce the cost of a policy.

The reserve fund you may create to pay for potential financial losses should be kept in highly liquid assets, such as money market mutual funds.³

Money market mutual funds are sold by prospectus. Please consider the charges, risks, expenses, and investment objectives carefully before investing. A prospectus containing this and other information about the investment company can be obtained from your financial professional. Read it carefully before you invest or send money.

Ultimately, the decision to self-insure—and to what degree—will be a function of how much risk you can afford to take on.

  1. Self-insuring is an insurance strategy based on certain assumptions. It is not intended to provide specific insurance advice. Keep in mind that the types of insurance examples and approaches illustrated may not be suitable for everyone. A financial professional can help with a risk evaluation.
  2. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Federal and state laws and regulations are subject to change, which may have an impact on after-tax investment returns. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation.
  3. Money held in money market funds is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Money market funds seek to preserve the value of your investment at $1.00 a share. However, it is possible to lose money by investing in a money market fund.
The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

When Does Your Personal Car Become a Commercial Vehicle?

For small business owners, the line between the personal and their business can be a bit hazy at times. Yet, when it comes to a vehicle that may be used for personal and business-related reasons, it’s important to know how your auto insurer is expected to define what constitutes commercial use.

If you own a car and cover it under a personal auto insurance policy, an insurance company may not pay claims for any damages you incur if the insurance company deems that it was used as a commercial vehicle.

Not being on the same page with your insurance carrier may result in financial losses, so it pays to ask yourself important questions about your vehicle’s use in order to select the right policy for your car.¹

The key distinction for determining if a personally owned car may need commercial auto insurance coverage is whether the vehicle is used for any business-related purpose.

Defining Business-Related Purpose

Your auto may be defined as a commercial vehicle if you use your vehicle to:

  • pick up or deliver any goods,
  • provide a service for a fee,
  • travel to a remote work location or between work locations, or
  • visit client locations.

Additional conditions under which your car may be defined as a commercial vehicle include:

  • the owner named on the vehicle title is a business—incorporated, unincorporated or LLC,
  • the vehicle is rented or leased by others,
  • the vehicle is equipped with a snow plow, has an altered suspension system or other equipment or modification, or
  • is driven by you or your employees for both business and personal use on a consistent basis.

If you use your personal vehicle for business reasons only occasionally, it may be covered under your personal policy, but you may need to indicate that on your application for auto insurance.

The wisest course of action is to describe how you expect to use your vehicle for personal and business purposes and let your insurance agent guide you to the most appropriate policy for your situation.

  1. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

The ABC’s of Auto Insurance

The questions around auto insurance center not so much on whether to have it—it’s mandated by state law, required by your lender, and serves to protect your assets—but what kind of coverage you should purchase.

Types of Coverage

There are several forms of coverage that a car owner may purchase, some of which are required, others of which may be optional.

The coverage requirements in all states include:

  • Bodily injury liability (pays for the cost of injuries you cause to another individual), and
  • Property damage liability (pays for the damage you cause to another’s car or to objects or structures you hit).

Some, but not all, states will require that you have coverage for:

  • Uninsured and underinsured motorists (covers the costs associated with being hit by an uninsured or underinsured driver, or in the case of a hit-and-run accident), and
  • Medical payments or personal injury protection (PIP) (pays for medical treatment for you and your passengers). PIP coverage is available in “no-fault” states and may also cover lost wages and funeral costs.

If you borrowed to purchase your car, the lender may require collision and comprehensive coverage.

Collision coverage reimburses you for damage to your car resulting from a collision with another car, object, or structure; a pothole; or from flipping over.

Comprehensive coverage is designed to pay for car damage not arising from a collision, e.g., theft, hail, windstorm, flood, fire, and hitting animals. This coverage may also pay for windshield repairs.

If you own your car outright, you may want to consider purchasing collision and comprehensive coverage if your car has a significant market value. You may find that the potential economic loss is sufficient to warrant the cost of collision and comprehensive protection.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.

Understanding Homeowner’s Insurance

Purchasing homeowner’s insurance is not only critical for protecting your home and personal property against any potential liability; if you have a mortgage, your lender will require it.

What’s Covered

A homeowner’s insurance policy is a package of coverages, including:

  • Dwelling: Covers damages to your house and any attached structures, including fixtures such as plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems.
  • Other Structures: Pays for damage to unattached structures, including a detached garage, tool shed, fence, etc.
  • Personal Property: Covers personal possessions such as appliances, furniture, electronics, clothes, etc.
  • Loss of Use: Reimburses for additional living expenses while you are unable to live in your home.
  • Personal Liability: Pays claims if you are found liable for injuries or damages to another party.
  • Medical Payments: Pays the medical bills incurred by people who are hurt on your property or by your pets.

Remember, these coverages pertain only to losses caused by a peril covered by your policy. For instance, if your policy doesn’t cover earthquake damage, then losses will not be reimbursed.

Types of Homeowner’s Policies

The types of covered perils will depend on the type of policy you buy.

The Special Form is the most popular policy since it insures against all perils, except those specifically named in the policy. Common exclusions include earthquakes and floods. Typically, flood insurance is obtained through the National Flood Insurance Program, while earthquake coverage may be obtained through an endorsement or a separate policy.

Limits of Coverage

Your policy will impose limits on the amount of covered losses.

If you have a valuable art collection or jewelry, you may want to secure additional insurance on those items.

Be aware of whether your policy insures for replacement cost (pays the cost to rebuild your home or repair damages using materials of similar kind and quality) or actual cash value (home value based on age and wear and tear), which may not cover all your losses.

Coordinating Umbrella Liability Coverage

Individuals with significant assets may want to consider attaching an umbrella policy to their homeowner’s policy, which provides liability coverage in excess of the liability limits of your current policy.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2017 FMG Suite.